The development of SARS-CoV-2 will continue and regular updates will be required for vaccines with limited effectiveness.

The development of SARS-CoV-2 will continue and regular updates will be required for vaccines with limited effectiveness.

That Royal Academy of Exact, Physical and Natural Sciences (RAC) and the Spanish Society of Virology (SEV) recently organized the conference “COVID-19: disease, consequences and perspectives for 2023”taught by the teacher Emilio Bouza, of the Biomedical Research Institute Gregorio Marañón and Professor of the Medical Faculty of the Complutense University of Madrid.

In his speech, the expert reflected on all that was learned and said what should be used to prevent future pandemics. Among other things, he emphasized that both primary care and the treating physicians must have one “disaster plan” specific to her. refer to hospital careyou need an “expansion plan” to avoid all the improvisational maneuvers experienced in the early stages of the pandemic.

Both primary care and treating physicians must have a specific “disaster plan” for them.

The professor also referred to the management of social-sanitary housing For seniors. “In general, major disasters like this pandemic need to be managed by the government, but there also needs to be a public health coordination center,” he urged.

“The current pandemic was and is one of many that humanity has suffered throughout history.”

“The current pandemic was and is one of many that humanity has suffered throughout history. We suffer it in a context of human and scientific development that has outlined some of its characteristics,” he added.

treatment and vaccinations

For Professor Bouza, SARS-CoV-2 was a virus “continuer of other corona viruses with major or minor clinical impact“. In parallel, he analyzed the state of the art in the medical treatment of this disease in relation to antiviral therapy, monoclonal antibodies and the use of anti-inflammatory drugs. As he pointed out, there are currently concerns about the definition, pathogenesis and therapeutic approach for the so-called long COVID or long COVID.

He also took stock of the uptake of vaccines and their impact on the pandemic. In this regard, he referred to the prospects for new vaccines, especially those that do not and cannot require intramuscular administration applied orally or intranasally.

Professor Bouza recommended “prudence in interpreting the World Health Organization’s (WHO) assumptions for a quick end to the pandemic”.

Looking ahead, Professor Bouza recommended “caution in interpreting the World Health Organization’s (WHO) assumptions for a speedy end to the pandemic.” In any case, this specialist has pointed out that there are still many open and unresolved problems. As an example, he cited the current discussion about the lessons left for the future by mask use and the advisability of maintaining their use in certain circumstances.

possible deterioration

professor Albrecht Bosch, President of the Spanish Society of Virology, who evaluated the current moment of the pandemic. “We are at a dead end. The situation in intensive care units is calm, but there are signs that it could soon deteriorate, apart from what happened in the first waves of COVID-19, thanks largely to good vaccination coverage.

He precisely recalled that the new campaign will be carried out with a vaccine consisting of the original Wuhan strain and the omicron BA.4 and BA.5. “These vaccines offer us protection against serious diseases, but they don’t against infection. On the other hand, the new variants, Omicron or those that appear, will escape the vaccine, although, I repeat, it is unlikely that they will be very virulent.

“These vaccines protect us from serious diseases, but not from infections.”

On the other hand, Professor Bosch confirmed the role of the scientific society, which brings together virus specialists, that is, Spanish virologists. “They are logically the ones who know the most about SARS-CoV-2, the causative agent of the virus COVID-19. Prominent members of the SEV have played, and will continue to play, integral roles in the procurement of vaccines and the development of antiviral therapies. They also have a leading role in the Generation of essential information about the virus to formulate new strategies that will allow us to overcome the pandemic”.

Public Health Perception

“The COVID-19 pandemic has one strong social and economic impact, and it has changed our perception of public health,” said Professor Esteban Domingo, a researcher at the Severo Ochoa Molecular Biology Center and Vice President of the Royal Academy of Exact, Physical and Natural Sciences. “The Academy reflects the issues affecting our society that have a scientific aspect to their understanding and correction,” he added.

In the RAC-SEV Conferences of 2020 and 2021, various effects of the pandemic. After almost three years of experience with COVID-19, this year’s organizers have focused on the disease, its different manifestations and the consequences that many patients continue to suffer from.

“Natural phenomena resulting from the interaction of several factors (epidemics, earthquakes, storms, etc.) are unpredictable.”

Regarding the future of the pandemic, Professor Domingo stressed that the emerging infectious diseases, as in the case of COVID-19, are characterized by the unpredictability of their evolution. “Even today, cases of illness occur again and again and new variants arise. Natural phenomena resulting from the interaction of several factors (epidemics, earthquakes, storms, etc.) are unpredictable.”

The development of SARS-CoV-2 will continue and this will require regular updates of vaccines which (like flu vaccines) will continue to have limited effectiveness.

In the further course it is possible that in 2023 and in the following years a situation similar to that of the human flu virus. In other words, the development of SARS-CoV-2 will continue, and this will require regular updates to vaccines, which (like flu vaccines) will continue to have limited effectiveness.

For older people and those with chronic illnesses or immunosuppressive medical treatments, COVID-19 will continue to be a problem. “This scenario could change if found a vaccine to prevent infection (not just the incidence of serious illness) or effective antiviral treatment,” he concluded.

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